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Fusionex Changing the Business Trends

Fusionex

Australian business Fusionex uniquely from a business “disease” called “The Tyranny of Distance”. This “disease” ravages remote and regional businesses, stunts their growth and isolates them from their city cousins. Researchers have now come up with an antidote to the present condition! The antidote, called “Digital Technology”, is predicted to possess an enormous impact on the health of regional and remote businesses
Australia’s leading role in digital engagement
It may come as a surprise to you, but Australia may be a world leader in “digital” engagement! Yes, that’s right, we are the planet leaders.

Nearly 50 years Fusionex the web was even thought of, Australia was already leading the way in remote communication. In 1950, Adelaide Miethke, an influential Adelaide schoolteacher, proposed a faculty of the Air to be found out through the radio network. This was a world-first in “digital” engagement and was driven primarily by the necessity to affect the tyranny of distance, a condition unique to Australia. With this ground-breaking background, it should be a natural progression for Australian business, to interact with the new technologies emerging within the digital space, that enable collaboration and communication in real time, over vast distances. One would presume that, given our history, Australia would be leading the sector in digital uptake, but reality doesn’t always meet expectation, and during this case Australia lags sadly behind world technology leaders.

Dealing with misconceptions
If you follow the govt advertising on TV, you’ll be forgiven for believing that the NBN goes to be the panacea to our digital woes which its introduction will magically bring us into line with other developed countries. What should be understood here, is that the NBN, while it’ll increase speeds and make engagement more accessible, won’t in itself, solve the problem! The world’s fastest broadband may be a white elephant if the buyer doesn’t engage it.

Misconception #1
It’s okay to await the NBN rollout before aged line
The problem with this idea is that if you await the NBN rollout, you begin from an edge of weakness, not strength.
Those who engage NOW, are going to be able to cash in of the NBN when it rolls out, while those that wait, are going to be playing catch-up.
Misconception #2

Digital technology is simply another add-on that takes up my time and money; I’m too busy “doing business” to even believe internet sites and social media
If you employ digital technology as an add-on, you’re probably right – it’ll take you time and money. However, digital engagement shouldn’t be seen as an add-on to your business, it should be viewed as an integral a part of your total business package
When you write a business plan, don’t write a separate “digital engagement” plan, write your digital engagement into your total business plan
Misconception #3
Engaging digitally is about internet sites and social media

True, it’s about internet sites and social media, but it isn’t almost that. Digital engagement is far broader than that. It’s about collaboration, it’s about communicating and connecting, it’s about sharing and learning, it’s about systems and processes that prevent time and money and it’s about easing the tyranny of distance.
Effective digital engagement would require you to re-think your business model. Executing a digital process management system will end in tears if you do not have your traditional process management in situ and dealing effectively first. Digitizing an inefficient business process won’t fix the matter it’ll merely offer you a business process that becomes inefficient more quickly!
If you catch on right from the beginning , the top results of digitization is that the creation of lifestyle
Where the Rubber Hits the Road

All this sounds great in theory, but what about the practicalities of creating it add a regional or remote business?

Example 1
I worked because the CEO of a foreign Indigenous community within the heart of the Pilbara. once I first arrived on the community, everything was done on paper – if you wanted to send money to subsequent community (380kms away), you came into my office, handed over the cash which was placed within the safe. a sale order was then written out and faxed to the community; they then took the cash from their safe and handed it to the person. They then made out an invoice to me and faxed it through to me. When it arrived, I had the board log off thereon (if I could find them!) then faxed the signed invoice through to the accountant in Adelaide!

By the time I finished on the community, every one had internet banking found out . All our invoicing and buy orders were done electronically and that we never transferred another cent off the community or faxed a sale order or invoice. additionally , a number of the younger members connected with friends on Skype where they were ready to chat to every other, play games and entertain themselves.

While i used to be there, we built a replacement store. With just one mail plane every week , getting an architect out there, accommodating him/her for every week and paying a wage for 8 days, would have cost us a fortune. However, using an on line collaboration program, i used to be ready to connect with the architect remotely, and that we designed the whole store on line, 380km apart!

Example 2
I have a client during a regional area. He approached me about digitizing his business but hadn’t though about what that entailed. In an examination of his processes, I discovered that his teams performed badly, his management structure was ineffective and his process management was almost non-existent.

Six months later, we are now at the purpose where all those issues are resolved and that we are able to implement the digital process. When finished, the whole management of the interface with customers are going to be handled on line. Customers will book their job on line, the administrator will assign and allocate teams to the project on line, (regardless of where they’re – the work could also be in Rockhampton, but it doesn’t matter) the system will automatically follow-up the purchasers , record details of the work completion, generate invoices and pay details and produce a series of reports.

The real great thing about this technique (which is ready-made to the actual needs of that company) is that the Director not must be running around after paperwork, checking on things and monitoring progress; because the system runs itself, he can go and sit on the beach in Hawaii and run the business from there, if he really wants!

Fusionex Powers up Digital Free Trade Zone (DFTZ) Platform

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Fusionex is leading a consortium to provide the e-services platform, powered by Big Data technologies, for the world’s first Digital Free Trade Zone (DFTZ) – a ground-breaking initiative jointly launched between the Malaysian Government and e-commerce marketplace titan, Alibaba.

With DFTZ being the brainchild of the Malaysian government, key drivers and stakeholders include the Ministry of Finance (MOF), Malaysia Digital Economy Corporation (MDEC), Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI), the Ministry of Transport (MOT), Royal Malaysia Customs Department, Malaysia Airports Holdings Berhad, POS Malaysia, the Malaysia External Trade Development Corporation (MATRADE), SME Corp, etc.

The DFTZ e-Services Platform is a trade facilitation platform that is integrated with other business service platforms and government service platforms, to facilitate a paperless, end-to-end and accurate data capture, data storage, data exchange and data analytics process, in respect of the high growth in internet trade activities.

The DFTZ will facilitate small and medium enterprises (SMEs) and merchants to capitalize on the internet community as well as the e-marketplace via a huge borderless addressable market. At the same time, these cost benefits and efficiencies inadvertently trickle down to consumers who would stand to enjoy faster, efficient and more cost-effective products and fulfillment.

At the DFTZ launch, Malaysian Prime Minister Dato’ Sri Najib Tun Razak declared, “We want to be the leader in the region for global trade. We want this to be the regional hub. We want SMEs to really grow by leaps and bounds and that can happen because of DFTZ. Digital Malaysia is the fastest growing sector in our economy. It is a sector that will enjoy double digit growth, and the sky is the limit! This (the DFTZ) is the part that will provide the growth, the potential, the impetus, the catalyst for us to change, redefine regional and global trade, redefine the role of SMEs, and redefine the partnership of Malaysia and China.”

The aim of the DFTZ is to capitalize on the convergence and exponential growth of the internet economy and cross-border e-commerce activities, by facilitating cross-border trade and enabling businesses to import and export goods with a priority for e-commerce.

Ivan Teh

To achieve this goal, the DFTZ will help businesses including SMEs expedite the transportation of goods regionally. For Phase 1, the DFTZ will set aside a section of the Kuala Lumpur International Airport (KLIA) Aeropolis for storage space and logistics facilities. This will then expand to other sites in subsequent phases.

During his keynote speech at the DFTZ launch, Alibaba Group Chairman and Founder Jack Ma commented, “I am impressed with Malaysia’s vision and speed. DFTZ and eWTP would help small businesses and individual eCommerce players benefit from global trade. Today we are witnessing that in Asia, small businesses can use digital ways to enable themselves to sell things, to buy things, to bridge moneys all across the world. Alibaba commits that we will make this thing – the first DFTZ, the first eWTP – very successful! This is not only an opportunity for Malaysia small businesses. This hub is a hope and opportunity for Asia’s young people and small businesses. It is the opportunity for Asia.”

Giving businesses access to the international market will result in a growing trend of orders and trades fueled by businesses not being confined to specific locations and time zones. The Prime Minister also highlighted that the DFTZ will create 60,000 new jobs and boost exports by SMEs to US$38 billion (MYR160 billion) by 2025.

The DFTZ is also expected to generate a huge amount of online transactions of orders, trade movements, payments, and more, coming in and going out of the country and region, hence the need for the platform to be powered by Big Data technologies.

Dato’ Seri Ivan Teh, Fusionex Group CEO, says: “The DFTZ is a first of its kind digital hub that brings together a multitude of key parties including trade facilitation players, e-marketplace players, government agencies, logistics providers, freight forwarders, and of course, SMEs. The state-of-the-art e-Services platform is powered by, amongst others, Big Data technologies and Machine Learning that will facilitate trade and allow transactions to take place faster, more cost effectively, more reliably and more efficiently.

This visionary initiative by the Malaysian government and Alibaba will pave the way to a seamless digital trade platform that will help remove unnecessary barriers, reduce costs and minimize or avoid unnecessary delays and encumbrances. We are delighted that Fusionex’s platform will power this initiative. At Fusionex, we believe this marks the beginning of a revolutionary way to perform trade regionally and globally, at speed and at scale.” https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20171107005846/en/Fusionex-Powers-Digital-Free-Trade-Zone-DFTZ